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Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160622
08/25/2017 03:17 AM
08/25/2017 03:17 AM
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Hurricane Harvey Poised to Unleash Flooding Disaster On Texas Into Early Next Week

Texas, Louisiana brace for major weather disaster

AccuWeather - August 25, 2017

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As Harvey continues to gather strength and moisture, the hurricane is poised to stall over coastal Texas and unleash life-threatening and disastrous flooding into next week.

Harvey will have major impact in terms of dangerous surf, beach erosion, coastal flooding and damaging winds. However, Harvey is likely to be remembered for tremendous rainfall and days of flooding.

Harvey is projected make landfall along the Texas coast on Friday night as a Category 3 hurricane. The storm strengthened to a Category 2 hurricane early Friday morning. The last hurricane to make landfall in Texas was Ike as a Category 2 on Sept. 13, 2008.

Wilma, in 2005, was the last major hurricane to make landfall in the southern U.S.

A state of disaster was declared for 30 counties in Texas in advance of Harvey by Gov. Greg Abbott.

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards declared a statewide state of emergency on Thursday.

The decreasing forward speed of the storm will lead to long-duration rainfall and gusty winds. Harvey will cause much worse damage from flooding and wind than would normally occur from a swift moving storm of equal magnitude.

"Impacts from Harvey will be tremendous in terms of displacement of people, property and economic loss and travel and freight disruptions," according to AccuWeather Vice President of Forecasting and Graphics Operations Marshall Moss.

Some communities could be under water for days

The event may be nothing short of a flooding disaster.

"Since Harvey is forecast to stall, we expect 10-20 inches of rain over a large part of southern and eastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana into early next week," according to AccuWeather Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski. "At the local level, more than 2 feet of rain may fall."

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This amount of rain will lead to widespread flooding of streets, highways, bayous, streams and major rivers.

Because of the flat terrain, some areas along the major rivers and bayous may remain flooded well after Harvey weakens or crawls away later next week.

Soon after the storm begins, roads in low-lying areas may become flooded. For those in flood-prone areas, now is the time to gather personal belongings.

Prolonged gusty winds to topple trees, lead to power outages

Since there is the potential for Harvey to stall close to the coast, the storm may retain significant strength for an extended period of time.

"If Harvey remains reasonably close to the coast, it could be classified as a tropical storm through the weekend," Kottlowski said.

[Linked Image]


"In addition to ongoing heavy rainfall, strong wind gusts and saturated ground will likely cause widespread fallen trees," according to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Mike Doll.

From Friday night to Saturday, gusts near and northeast of the center of landfall will range between 80 and 120 mph.

Beyond Saturday gusts between 40 and 60 mph may continue into Monday and perhaps Tuesday.

When trees fall and catch utility lines, power outages will result. Power outages will be lengthy as the storm's effects last for days. Fallen trees and power lines will block some roads. Some gas stations may not have power to run the pumps. Some refineries may have to shut down.

"If the power goes out during the storm, it could take days and perhaps a week or more for crews to get to all locations, due to lingering flooding," Doll said.

There will also be the potential for brief, spin-up tornadoes.

"As Harvey makes landfall, the risk of tornadoes will be greatest near and northeast of the center," Kottlowski said. "Once Harvey is inland, isolated tornadoes could occur throughout the circulation of the storm."

Harvey to bring dangerous conditions, cause damage at the coast

Seas and surf along the western Gulf coast will build well ahead of Harvey's arrival.

How strong Harvey becomes prior to landfall will determine the initial magnitude of inundation and damage along the coast.

"The combination of storm surge and wave action will bring a total inundation of 6-12 feet in coastal areas and bays with the greatest inundation north of the center of landfall," Kottlowski said.

[Linked Image]

Some of the worst coastal inundation on the storm's front side may occur along Lavaca Bay, Matagorda Bay, San Antonio Bay, Copano Bay and Aransas Bay, Texas.

South of the storm track, winds blowing offshore may cause flooding on the eastern part of Laguna Madre, on Padre Island, Texas.

"Very rough seas and dangerous rip currents will occur well away from where Harvey makes landfall, including northeastern Mexico and the northern Gulf coast of the U.S."

The long-duration storm is likely to cause extensive beach erosion and raise the risk of property damage along the coast.

Harvey may stay alive for days

There is a chance that Harvey meanders back over the western or northern Gulf of Mexico for a time after making landfall. Some regeneration and strengthening could occur in this case.

As a result, all interests from northeastern Mexico to the U.S. northern Gulf coast will need to monitor the progress of Harvey.

Eventually, Harvey may find a way well inland over the central or eastern U.S. as a tropical rainstorm later next week and into the Labor Day weekend.

Only if the system moves inland and stays away from the coast will the storm diminish.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160623
08/25/2017 07:53 AM
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This storm is no joke. I've seen two models that do indeed have Harvey moving back out into the Gulf and making a second landfall further north. This thing is going to be catastrophic, and has the potential to be as devastating as Katrina was.

Al Gore will blame this storm on global warming in 5, 4, 3...

Onward and upward,
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Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160624
08/25/2017 11:56 AM
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It's up to Cat 4 now. Houston is gonna get skullf##cked. The flooding will be epic.

Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160625
08/25/2017 03:09 PM
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Seven things Trump should [b]not[/b] do after Harvey :

Quote
1) Accuse people selling water or fuel in storm-hit areas of price gouging. Many of the folks who take on the risk of heading into an unstable area do so because they are driven by the twin motivations of fellow-feeling and greed. These people are often the fastest and most effective at getting supplies where they are most needed, because that's also where they can get the best price. This is just as true for Walmart as it is for the guy who fills his pickup with Poland Spring and batteries. Don't use the bully pulpit to vilify disaster entrepreneurs, small or large.

2) Establish a central command for volunteers. One of the tragic lessons of Hurricane Katrina was that by trying to control who gets into a storm zone to help, governments can wind up blockading good people who could do good while waiting for approval from Washington in a situation where communications are often bad. Ordinary people see and know things about what their friends and neighbors need and want that FEMA simply can't be expected to figure out.

3) Fearmonger about civic breakdown and looting. After storms, Americans are typically cooperative and law-abiding. Unfounded fear of looting makes people stay in their homes when they are in danger, return too quickly after the storm passes, and regard each other with distrust at a moment when solidarity is most needed. And there's corollary to this one:

3a) Confiscate guns. Emergency workers and law enforcement shouldn't waste post-storm effort rooting around in people's homes for firearms. Law-abiding gun owners do not, by and large, turn into characters from Grand Theft Auto when they get wet.

4) Throttle entry and exit from the storm zone by keeping immigration checkpoints open. Nothing is classier than having the Border Patrol asking people who have just lost everything—including their important papers—for their papers, please.

5) Insist on managing housing for the displaced. After storms, Americans look for ways to reach out and help. Many would open their homes to people who need a place to stay. Private charities can help broker these placements, as they do now for international refugees.

6) Let bureaucracy stand in the way of communities rebuilding on their own. After a storm, getting schools and hospitals up and running requires speed. That means waiving bureaucratic requirements. Requiring citizens to push paper in order to get their communities functioning again is wasteful even in non-crisis situations, but can be especially painful for cities whose infrastructure has washed away.

7) Increase funding for the federal flood insurance program. When it comes time to rebuild, everyone will studiously avoid discussing the fact that maybe we shouldn't be using a massive federal insurance program to incentivize building in areas that are repeatedly hit by storms. There's a reason private insurers don't offer policies to many coastal dwellers, and it ain't "market failure." (This seems ungenerous to say in the moment when people are facing the loss of their homes and businesses, but it'll be even harder to say or hear after the storm hits.)
I'm betting Trump ends up doing all of them.

Onward and upward,
airforce

Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160626
08/25/2017 03:44 PM
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A local sheriff was on the news a few minutes ago and said that anyone caught doing item number one would be arrested and prosecuted. He said price gougers would not be tolerated in his county.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160627
08/25/2017 03:59 PM
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Quote
Originally posted by ConSigCor:
A local sheriff was on the news a few minutes ago and said that anyone caught doing item number one would be arrested and prosecuted. He said price gougers would not be tolerated in his county.
I am seriously not surprised. Disappointed, but not surprised.

Onward and upward,
airforce

Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160628
08/25/2017 06:08 PM
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I'm not disappointed. I despise jerks who are out to make a fast buck off people in a desperate situation.

FEMA is now saying the same thing...taking unfair advantage of people will not be tolerated. Good for them.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160629
08/26/2017 04:11 AM
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Quote
Originally posted by ConSigCor:
I'm not disappointed. I despise jerks who are out to make a fast buck off people in a desperate situation.

FEMA is now saying the same thing...taking unfair advantage of people will not be tolerated. Good for them.
If they don't want to pay the higher price, they don't have to. But if you need a couple sheets of plywood, and someone else manages to go out of his way to get plywood into a disaster area, then that's what capitalism is. Two parties agreeing to a price without government interference.

Onward and upward,
airforce

Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160630
08/26/2017 07:04 AM
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No reported fatalities so far. It's early yet, but that is encouraging.

Onward and upward,
airforce

Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160631
08/26/2017 09:04 AM
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One confirmed dead in Rockport. More expected.

Search and rescue operations ongoing.

At least 300,000 without power. Much of the area water supply is also down.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160632
08/26/2017 09:53 AM
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Panic buying mostly hit the liquor store and gas stations here.


Well, this is it.
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160633
08/26/2017 10:04 AM
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Mex, any tornadoes or flooding in your area yet?


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160634
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I saw a report that someone was selling bottled water for $99, and the newscaster was suitably appalled.

Well, I'm appalled that someone was dumb enough not to stock up on water an other supplies in advance of a hurricane. I think this should be considered a learning experience - that person will be unlikely to be that dumb in the future.

What if that gas station didn't have the foresight to stock up on water? Then no water would be available at any price. Personally, I think the store owner should be applauded for having the foresight to have enough water on hand for emergencies. Seriously, this is how supply and demand works.

Onward and upward,
airforce

Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160635
08/26/2017 11:05 AM
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San Antonio is GTG. Huricane is stalling out. We're getting some good rain and wind, but nothing crazy.


Molon Labe
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160636
08/26/2017 11:28 AM
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Mex, any tornadoes or flooding in your area yet?

Nope, we've seen regular winter rain worse than this. The good news is that this should take us off of stage 1 water restrictions. The bad news is that I'll have to cut the grass again next week.


Well, this is it.
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160637
08/27/2017 02:11 AM
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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160638
08/27/2017 04:22 AM
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Houston and Galveston experiencing severe flooding. Some reports of relief efforts being overwhelmed. They are now calling for private citizens with boats to rescue their neighbors.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160639
08/27/2017 04:49 AM
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I just saw a report about it on Faux News. I haven't seen anything like this since Katrina.

And of course, they're talking about "price gouging" now. Sigh.

Onward and upward,
airforce

Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160640
08/27/2017 05:40 AM
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Tropical Storm Harvey blog: What you need to know
http://www.king5.com/weather/hurricane-harvey-blog-what-you-need-to-know/468149129

* 12 people now reported dead.

* Exxon and Shell refineries shut down.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160641
08/27/2017 07:54 AM
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Urgent warning: Federal help is coming to Texas. And FEMA is going to be there for the next couple of years. Scam artists are overjoyed.

Quote
"! will be going to Texas as soon as that trip can be made without causing disruption," President Trump tweeted Sunday morning. "The focus must be life and safety."

Thanks for the warning.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency is already here, boots on the ground, doing the kinds of the FEMA things that have endeared this federal agency to a generation of American taxpayers. Look out now for the recovery housing teams and the National Flood Insurance Program inspectors, Administrator Brock Long promised Jake Tapper on CNN Sunday morning.

When asked by Tapper if Hurricane Harvey-soaked Texans can expect FEMA to be here in the coming weeks and months, Long replied with a can-do expression, "FEMA's gonna be there for years, sir. We're setting up and gearing up for the next couple of years."

Thanks again for the warning.

It might be churlish not to welcome the rescuers (I am writing this from Austin, where the rain from a hurricane 200 miles away is causing flooding), with five people reported dead, millions of people affected in some way, and damages that will surely reach into the billions, as Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick told Fox News this morning.

No one is happier to see this outpouring of federal concern more than Texas' conservative political leaders.

"I've got to tell you," Gov. Greg Abbott told anchor Chris Wallace on Fox Sunday morning, "I give FEMA a grade of A plus, all the way from the president down. I've spoken to the president several times, to his Cabinet members, such as secretary of homeland security, such as the administrator of FEMA, such as Tom Price, the secretary of health and human services."

"We could not be more appreciative of what the federal government has done, from the president on down," Abbott gushed to anchor George Stephanopoulos on the creatively named This Week with George Stephanopoulos. "Because, everything we have asked for, they have given us."

Everything. Since Hurricane Katrina in 2005 it has been ruinous for any politician at any level with any authority to offer anything less than everything in a disaster. The bigger the disaster, the bigger the stage.

FEMA's annual budget averaged $700 million throughout the 1980s and was still under $3 billion until the end of the 1990s, according to a study by Chris Edwards, director of tax policy studies at the Cato Institute and editor of DownsizingGovernment.org. In the years after Katrina, the FEMA average budget has been $13 billion and in fiscal 2013, following the last of three consecutive severe hurricane seasons, ballooned to $22 billion.

With all of this spending on Hurricane Harvey, Katrina, and the others, come elected officials exercising control under the guise of leadership.

Right on schedule, and ignoring the admonition of Reason's Katherine Mangu-Ward, Attorney General Ken Paxton announced his office would be manning a consumer protection hotline. In big blue letters on the AG's main page it reads: "Hurricane Harvey—Watch Out For Price Gouging and Scams."

Paxton hasn't been reluctant to dispense with the niceties of having the public step back from taking care of themselves and letting their government take over.


As convinced as these authority figures are that their pronouncements of action are calming and uplifting, we can't help but think how willfully these rescuers ignore the abominable record of the federal government in the aftermath of big blows like Harvey. The tiresomely predictable response so far in Texas is echoed in Reason's exhaustive coverage after Katrina.

"No government screwup is so colossal that it can't be used to justify yet more government," we wrote in our 2005 roundup of the coverage, "After the Storm." "For most liberals, Katrina merely proved that Washington needs more resources to prevent and respond to such disasters; for many conservatives, it proved that society is a fragile construct that can collapse into chaos at any moment, and that only police or military force can hold it together in times of stress."

To cite just a few examples of federal bungling after Katrina noted by Edwards, as much as $2 billion was wasted, at least $1 billion of it in invalid federal aid to 162,750 people who claimed to live in houses that did not exist before the hurricane; $900 million wasted on 25,000 mobile homes that could not be used on floodplains; and $100 million taxpayers paid for bags of ice that never got delivered.

"Among the many superlatives associated with Hurricane Katrina can now be added this one," The New York Times wrote in 2006, "it produced one of the most extraordinary displays of scams, schemes and stupefying bureaucratic bungles in modern history, costing taxpayers up to $2 billion."

Rather than tromping all over coastal Texas speechifying and ordering people around, the president and the FEMA stormtroopers ought to listen to the people who made it out on the other side of Harvey.


Like Bill Rogers of Port Aransas, who decided to ride it out in his pickup truck with his wife Paulette and their four dogs, according to a pretty wonderful story in the Dallas Morning News.

Rogers called it the dumbest thing he'd ever done. But wasn't he afraid Harvey would kill him, the reporter asked.

"Death? I ain't afraid of death," he said. "What I'm afraid of is the IRS."
Onward and upward,
airforce

Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160642
08/27/2017 12:18 PM
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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160643
08/28/2017 02:30 AM
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Hurricane Harvey Will Render Some Parts Of Texas ‘Uninhabitable For An Extended Period Of Time’

Do you remember what Hurricane Katrina did to New Orleans?

Michael Snyder - August 28, 2017

Do you remember what Hurricane Katrina did to New Orleans? Well, now we are watching the same thing happen to southeast Texas. On Friday, Hurricane Harvey made landfall as a category 4 hurricane.

It is the first hurricane to make landfall in the United States in 12 years, and it is the most powerful storm to hit the state of Texas in at least 50 years. One meteorologist is saying that what we are witnessing is “worse than the worst-case scenario for Houston”, and another stated that this storm “could easily be one of the worst flooding disasters in U.S. history”.

It would be difficult to overstate the devastation in the Houston area at this moment. Hurricane Harvey has ripped roofs off of homes, turned vehicles over and snapped thousands of trees. Thousands have been rescued from their homes and vehicles, and it is being reported that so far five people have died. In fact, one woman’s dead body was actually spotted floating down the street.

According to the National Weather Service, over 24 inches of rain fell in Houston in just a 24 hour period. More rain continues to fall in southeast Texas, and meteorologists are running out of adjectives to describe the nightmare that is currently unfolding…

“It’s catastrophic, unprecedented, epic — whatever adjective you want to use,” Patrick Blood, a National Weather Service meteorologist, told the Chronicle. “It’s pretty horrible right now.” The newspaper reported the weather service said five people have died in the Houston area in unconfirmed flood-related deaths.

The latest forecasts are telling us that we could see a total of 40 to 50 inches of rain in southeast Texas by Thursday, and so some areas will actually receive a “year’s worth of rain” in less than a week…

“A year’s worth of rain may fall in the span of a few days near the Texas Gulf Coast,” reported Weather.com. “A multi-day deluge of the Texas Gulf Coast with catastrophic and life-threatening flooding and destructive winds through could leave areas uninhabitable for an extended period of time, the National Weather Service has warned.”

Did you catch that last part?

The National Weather Service is actually saying that some portions of Texas could be “uninhabitable for an extended period of time” as a result of this storm.

It appears to be inevitable that more people are doing to die before this is all over. Authorities are trying to rescue as many people as they can, but there just aren’t enough resources.

As the water continues to climb, some people are actually climbing into their attics in a desperate attempt to save themselves, but that is a very bad idea…

“We are getting calls from people climbing into their attic. This is along I-45 between downtown and Clear Lake,” Lindner said. “This is along Berry Bayou, Beamer Ditch, Turkey Creek, portions of Clear Creek, Vince Bayou, Little Vince Bayou in Pasadena,” he said. “Pretty much the entire southeast side of Harris County has had 13 to 15 inches of rain in three hours.”

Lindner said they’re also seeing flooding along portions of Hunting Bayou, downtown along Buffalo Bayou, Brays Bayou and Keegan’s Bayou.

Chief Art Acevedo tweeted,” have reports of people getting into attic to escape floodwater do not do so unless you have an ax or means to break through onto your roof.”

This is already being called “a once in a 500 year flood”, and the experts are already telling us that the total economic damage is going to be in the tens of billions of dollars.

Earlier this month, I wrote about an unusual series of events that would happen over a 40 day period starting with the recent solar eclipse, but of course at the time I couldn’t account for additional unexpected events such as Hurricane Harvey. And I find it very interesting that this hurricane began forming just about the same time as the eclipse. The following comes from Wikipedia…

The eighth named storm, third hurricane, and the first major hurricane of the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season, Harvey developed from a tropical wave to the east of the Lesser Antilles on August 17. The storm crossed through the Windward Islands on the following day, passing just south of Barbados and later near Saint Vincent. Upon entering the Caribbean Sea, Harvey began to weaken due to moderate wind shear and degenerated into a tropical wave north of Colombia early on August 19. The remnants were monitored for regeneration as it continued west-northwestward across the Caribbean and the Yucatán Peninsula, before re-developing over the Bay of Campeche on August 23. Harvey then began to rapidly intensify on August 24, re-gaining tropical storm status and becoming a hurricane later that day. Moving generally northwestwards, Harvey’s intensification phase stalled slightly overnight from August 24–25, however Harvey soon resumed strengthening and became a Category 4 hurricane late on August 25. Hours later, Harvey made landfall near Rockport, Texas, at peak intensity.

As a result of this storm, thousands could be trapped in their homes without power for an extended period of time.

Do you think that those that have been storing up food and emergency supplies all this time will be glad that they have done so?

Of course the answer to that question is obvious. If you wait until disaster strikes to get prepared, it will be too late. A whole lot of people down in Texas are going to end up in some very desperate situations because they never believed that something like this could ever happen to them.

For those of you that would like some helpful advice on getting prepared for future disasters, I would encourage you to check out a book that I co-authored with Barbara Fix entitled “Get Prepared Now”. Barbara is a highly respected prepping expert, and she is also getting heavily involved in my campaign for Congress. So much of the information in that book is timeless, and my hope is that we can encourage as many people as possible to start getting prepared because very troubled times are ahead of us.

Please pray for the people in Houston and throughout the entire southeast Texas area. We truly have not seen a storm like this since Hurricane Katrina, and many portions of the Texas Gulf Coast will be changed forever by this disaster.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160644
08/28/2017 03:09 AM
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Hurricane Harvey prepper update: Sh#t just hit the fan in South Texas… non-preppers hurting badly as food, water, power and emergency services FAIL

Sunday, August 27, 2017 by: Mike Adams

News from inside Hurricane Harvey:

Local towns are experiencing so much flooding that some are cutting off municipal water supplies.

This is on top of the power grid outages, cell phone outages, store closures and widespread road closures that have taken place here in the last 12 hours.

For the time being, everyone is on their own, with little available outside help. I’ve seen tweets of people pleading to be rescued as their homes flood, and those are the lucky ones who still have bandwidth access. Many people are completely cut off with no services at all: No electricity, no municipal water, no 911 response services, etc. As much as I want to help these people, I can’t even get to them (and neither can anyone else).

Hurricane Harvey is a strong reminder that prepping is the best insurance you can buy. While surrounding areas had no power, I cranked up my John Deere tractor with a PTO generator, providing power to my entire property for the cost of about two gallons of diesel per hour. This tractor-generator setup is virtually EMP-proof as long as you’re using an older tractor, like the one shown below. I call it the “ultimate backup generator” arrangement, and it’s mobile by design (photo courtesy of Steambrite.com)

Quick list of services that have been cut off or FAILED

This is in no way a criticism of emergency response services in Texas, by the way. Governor Abbott is doing a fantastic job, and local responders are also on the ball, saving lives by the hour. Texas has a powerful spirit of survival and preparedness, and that’s why the body count has been so low, given the “end of the world” prognostications we’ve been hearing from the media.

Despite the best efforts of everyone involved, however, this storm is flat-out brutal in terms of the volume of rain it’s dropping on a concentrated area. The flooding is truly reaching apocalyptic levels, and no government, no matter how motivated, can stop a 25-foot wall of water rushing over the banks of a creek or river. (Be sure to follow more news on disaster preparedness at Disaster.news.)

With that in mind, here are some of the services that have been cut off. Let this be a reminder to everyone that in a dire emergency, you may not be able to rely on anyone but yourself. You may be cut off from help just like we’re seeing across much of Texas right now:

Municipal water is being turned OFF due to rising waters and possible contamination from septic systems (cholera, anyone?)
Electrical services are failing as winds snap off heavy branches that take down power lines. Local power companies then have to fight the wind and rain to repair lines in extremely low-visibility conditions.
911 services are totally overloaded in some areas. Calls are simply going unanswered.
Emergency responders such as police and sheriff deputies can’t reach you anyway.
Many ROADS are completely flooded over, bringing transportation to a standstill and causing massive traffic jams.
Hospitals and emergency rooms are functioning on emergency power, but that only helps if you can reach them.
Medical transport helicopters are GROUNDED due to extremely high winds and very low visibility. Only Coast Guard pilots are trained to operate military-class helicopters in such conditions. For anybody else, taking to the skies in a helicopter is “power line suicide.”
Food deliveries to local grocery stories are disrupted, and many shelves have been emptied out. Food supplies may be disrupted for an entire WEEK.
The entire city of Houston has declared it will shut down for a full week. No government services. No passport processing. No DMV. If you need something from the city of Houston, you’re out of luck.
Fuel deliveries are also being disrupted, and some gas stations are near empty. Once the roads are usable again, we will quickly see lack of fuel becoming a serious problem.
Cell phone services are on and off in some areas, mostly due to the density of the rain. This means if you need to call 911, you really can’t. It’s one more reason to be prepared to solve your own problems.

Despite all these failures, we’ve been just fine because we are always prepared with food, water filters, backup power, emergency medicine, self-defense firearms, radios, flashlights and so on.

The people who are hurting the worst are those who are not preppers, and many of those people think “prepping” is “stupid.”

Suddenly the tables are turned, it seems. Over about the last 36 hours, nearly everyone in Texas gradually came to realize that preppers are the real geniuses. Prepping, it turns out, is the best insurance you can buy.

Watch my video report to learn more:

https://youtu.be/uv47QsLw1YQ


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160645
08/28/2017 04:14 AM
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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160646
08/29/2017 03:14 AM
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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160647
08/29/2017 01:57 PM
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I'm on the phone right now with a good friend/Teammate that used to be with Blackwater, and is in SW Houston TX.

They just instituted a 10pm curfew

That the looting is by far worse then what took place during Katrina .

No one has tried to seize the guns yet but that it is getting really really ugly and that if you are down there you better be armed right now.

LOTS of out of state plated vehicles from as far away as New York to California down there joining in on the looting.

The George R. Brown Convention Center is the Texas version of the Astro-Dome for the refugees and that it is already a cesspool of filth and worse then Katrina.

Lots of people with open wounds from flying debris from the rescue helicopters.

Pasadena has flooded and the Storage tank farms containing crude oil, gasoline, diesel and other compounds there have spilled out and all that crap has mixed with the flood waters that people are walking through.

When they opened up the Addicks Reservoir is when a family member's of his suddenly flooded, but it was dry and safe before that.

Surprise surprise, apparently we are getting a whitewashed version of things.

Just telling you what I'm being told here by a fellow Threepercenter .

As I hear more I'll post it.


My Daddy is like duct tape, he can fix almost anything.

A quote from my youngest daughter at 4yrs old, many years ago.
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160648
08/29/2017 03:07 PM
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If that's true, it won't take ling for the press to get wind of it. The media hates trump, and they would love to do the same thing they did with Bush and Katrina.

I wonder where Geraldo Rivera is right now.

Onward and upward,
airforce

Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160649
08/29/2017 04:05 PM
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I've been watching 2 live feeds out of Houston.

They report that the curfew is from 12 midnight to 5am.

Police report 12 looters arrested and said that a group of looters fired upon some of the Cajun Navy guys. Police chief issued a strong statement that looting will not be tolerated.

Residents interviewed by local media aren't reporting any problems yet...but fear looting may start after the water level drops.

Video feeds of G R Brown convention center make it appear to be clean and well organized. Nothing like Katrina. Congresswoman Jackson Lee is there now touring the place.

From what I've watched so far the rescue/relief efforts have been well coordinated and carried out by multiple agencies and a ton of civilian volunteers...especially considering the magnitude of the situation.

But, no matter what anyone does, this disaster is bad and will continue to be a terrible situation for all involved for a very long time.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160650
08/30/2017 02:52 AM
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https://thetruth24.net/2017/08/30/h...imposing-a-curfew-from-10-pm-until-5-am/
...."Houston Mayor @SylvesterTurner is imposing a curfew from 10 p.m. until 5 a.m. "

Lot's of confusion down there.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/08/29/houston-combating-harvey-looters-with-mandatory-jail-time.html
The City of Houston and surrounding counties are not playing around with looters taking advantage of the massive floods caused by Harvey.

“People displaced or harmed in this storm are not going to be easy prey,” Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg said, noting that burglarizing a home in a disaster area could carry a life sentence under Texas law. Prosecutors said at least 14 suspected looters were arrested, and Brazoria County announced a curfew in mandatory-evacuation areas for Tuesday night.

“Anyone who tries to take advantage of this storm to break into homes or businesses should know that they are going to feel the full weight of the law,” Ogg said. “Offenders will be processed around the clock without delay.”

The Montgomery County District Attorney’s office posted a warning on Monday that any looters, thieves or burglars caught victimizing area residents would be arrested and served up mandatory jail time, according to the Houston Chronicle.

“(District Attorney Brett) Ligon announced today that his office will seek prison or jail time in each and every forthcoming case where the defendant stands charged with theft (looting), burglary, robbery, or any similar crime committed during Hurricane Harvey,” the DA’s office posted on Facebook. “Leniency and probation will be off the table for these offenses committed during this time.”

According to Montgomery County officials, state law “allows for enhanced punishment ranges for certain offenses committed during a declared natural disaster event.”

Ligon also commented on the need to enforce the law.

I'm just passing on what he said, he also said that alot of what is really going on is being controlled, he is assisting with the relief.


My Daddy is like duct tape, he can fix almost anything.

A quote from my youngest daughter at 4yrs old, many years ago.
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160651
08/30/2017 03:47 AM
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They've issued strong warnings against looting from the beginning. Made it a point to say that this would not be another Katrina. Even the fine for price gouging the elderly is $50,000.

Anytime there's a disaster you know the trash will come out to loot and steal. I hope they throw the book at them.


Houston Mayor Orders Curfew To Prevent Looting, Warns Bridges And Roads Are “Starting To Fail”

The curfew will start at midnight and end at 5am

Zero Hedge - August 30, 2017

Update: Houston’s Mayor imposed a curfew on Tuesday after the US city saw record rainfall and catastrophic flooding in the wake of tropical storm Harvey.

The curfew will start at midnight and end at 5am, Mayor Sylvester Turner explained. Originally it was supposed to start earlier (as per his tweet below), but Turner said he wanted “to allow volunteers and others to do their great work.”

The curfew is intended to prevent property crimes against evacuated homes in the city, he added…

Imposing curfew from 10 pm to 5 am to stop any property crimes against evacuated homes in city limits.

— Sylvester Turner August 29, 2017

Police Chief Art Acevedo said at an earlier news conference that curfew violators will be stopped, questioned, searched and arrested.

There have been scattered reports of looting during the flooding from Tropical Storm Harvey.

* * *

We detailed earlier that as Tropical Storm Harvey heads back inland, slamming southwest Texas with another 15-25 inches of rain, Houston officials are reporting that the city’s critical infrastructure is starting to fail under the weight of the floodwaters, and may soon collapse.

According to Reuters, roads and bridges in Houston have started to buckle under the impact of the catastrophic flooding in parts of the city. According to Jeff Linder of the Harris County Flood Control District, one bridge had collapsed and some roads had been damaged by the torrential rains.

Worse, the damage is far from over. As reported yesterday, the water levels at two reservoirs to the west of the city, where more than 3,000 homes have been flooded, continue to rise. Meanwhile, Buffalo Bayou, the primary drainage system that runs through the city, is holding steady and may not recede for days, said Edmond Russo, deputy engineer with the US Army Corps of Engineers. According to USGS data, the Buffalo Bayou has recorded a record 33 inches of rain, and another 20 is expected in the coming 48 hours.

Linder said the level of the Houston Ship Channel, which opens out into Galveston Bay was “at levels we’ve never seen before”, slowing the bayou’s ability to drain. Two major dams outside Houston have also begun to overflow, according to the BBC.

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner confirmed that one police officer has been killed since the flooding began. The Houston police chief says the officer’s body was recovered Tuesday morning. He apparently died when floodwaters overcame his vehicle as he tried to get to his post.

Meanwhile, the Port of Houston is reporting that all facilities will remain closed on Wednesday, leaving oil tankers carrying an estimated 17 million barrels of crude oil stranded off shore with their cargo.

At least nine people have died as a result of the flooding, including six members of one family.

Floodwaters have swept away some of the concrete barrier at the San Jacinto Bridge…

Finally, recall last night’s dire prediction by one engineer on twitter.

If he is right, the dire forecast by Imperial Capital analyst David Havens who predicted that the final Harvey cost would surpass $100 billion, or 3 times more than what most believe the Harvey damages will amount to, will prove to be pleasantly optimistic in retrospect.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160652
08/30/2017 04:49 AM
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They\'re warning people abou5t burglars posing as ICE and Homeland Security agents. They're telling people to evacuate their homes, and then burglarizing them.

Here's an article byJohn Stossel explaining why prices should rise during disasters like this . Price controls always lead to shortages.

Onward and upward,
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Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160653
08/30/2017 05:31 AM
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I can understand a price increase during a situation like this. If your cost goes up so should the price by a 'reasonable' amount. But, if you try to charge me $99 for a 3 dollar case of water...I'll put a gun to your head and take what I need.

I find these libertarian excuses for ripping people off lame. What happened to helping people in need rather than trying to make a fast buck by taking advantage of a bad situation?


Unprecedented Disaster: Hurricane Harvey Has Shattered The Rainfall Record For The Continental United States

Never before have we seen a storm dump more than 50 inches of rain on a single location in the continental United States

Michael Snyder | Economic Collapse - August 30, 2017

The previous record for rainfall in the continental United States occurred when Tropical Storm Amelia dumped 48 inches of rain on Medina, Texas in 1978. But now one spot in southeast Texas has already received 52 inches of rain, and the rain continues to fall. And overall, 14 different spots in the Houston area have already gotten more than 40 inches of rain. Authorities are telling us that this will easily be the most costly disaster in all of U.S. history, but nobody will be able to truly assess the total damage that has been done until the rain finally stops.

Sadly, meteorologists say that some parts of Texas will continue to get more rain all the way through Thursday. By that time, some areas may receive an additional 20 inches of rain on top of what they already have…

Wide swaths of southeast Texas have been devastated by Tropical Storm Harvey, with some areas drowning in nearly 40 inches of water — and Lone Star State residents are bracing for another beating with up to 20 more inches of rain.

If you have seen video of the flooding that is taking place in Houston, it is hard to imagine that things could get much worse. As I mentioned above, many areas already have more than 40 inches of rain, and one spot in southeast Texas has actually gotten 52 inches of rain…

A preliminary report from a rain gauge on the Cedar Bayou, east of Highlands, Texas, reported 51.88 inches of rain as of 3 p.m. Tuesday, according to the National Weather Service.

Earlier in the day, a weather station southeast of Houston at Mary’s Creek at Winding Road, reported 49.32 inches of rain, the weather service said.

Both reports break the previous continental U.S. record of 48 inches set in 1978 in Medina, Texas, by Tropical Storm Amelia.

In addition to all of the rainfall, a major problem is the fact that river levels are rising to extremely dangerous levels. One levee has already been breached, and water has gone over the top of the 108 foot spillway for the Addicks Reservoir for the first time in history…

An already-swollen reservoir west of downtown Houston overtopped its spillway Tuesday, sending an “uncontrolled release” of Harvey’s floodwaters into nearby neighborhoods, as a separate levee breach south of the city prompted an urgent warning for residents to leave immediately.

Floodwaters in the the Addicks Reservoir, located about 19 miles west of downtown, went over the top of the 108-foot spillway for the first time in history, threatening immediate surrounding subdivisions.

Unfortunately, disasters such as this tend to bring out the worst in people. As I mentioned yesterday, police have been busy rounding up looters, and some businesses have been caught engaging in extreme price gouging…

Over the weekend, more than 500 complaints of price gouging were lodged with the Texas attorney general’s office, according to CNBC—including $99 cases of bottled water, gas at $10 a gallon and hotels tripled or quadrupled in price.

I suppose that it is just human nature to do that, but to me that is utterly shameful.

It is during times of testing that our character is truly revealed. So many down in Houston have been absolutely incredible throughout this entire crisis, while others have shown all of us who they really and truly are.

Our fourth largest city is in the process of literally being destroyed, and I am so thankful for everyone that is working to rescue, house and feed those that are in desperate need. Sadly, there are others that are not stepping up to the plate, and they are being greatly criticized for it.

According to former FEMA Director Michael Brown, the economic damage being done by this storm will ultimately make it “the most expensive natural disaster in American history”…

“There are several factors that make it worse than Katrina. For one, there is the scope of the flooding. Harris County and the surrounding areas are so saturated,” Brown told the Houston Chronicle.

“Also, the amount of damages will continue to grow. There will be mold and structural damages adding up.” Brown said when Tropical Storm Harvey finally goes away, it will leave an incredible bill for taxpayers to pick up.

“This will be unfathomably expensive for both the private sector and taxpayers,” Brown said. “This will be easily the most expensive natural disaster in American history.”

Please pray for southeast Texas and for all of the people that have had their lives turned completely upside down by this storm. We have never seen anything like this before in the history of our country, and this crisis is still far from over.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160654
08/30/2017 06:58 AM
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Quote
Originally posted by ConSigCor:
...I find these libertarian excuses for ripping people off lame. What happened to helping people in need rather than trying to make a fast buck by taking advantage of a bad situation?...
I've seen reports of that $99 case of water. I haven't seen any reports of people actually paying it. And it's a funny thing, but I haven't heard too many reports of water shortages since that report came out, either.

Why not? It's the free market at work. Neighbor 1 complains to Neighbor 2 about the store selling $99 water. "That's ridiculous," says Neighbor 2. "Fortunately, I was smart enough to buy several cases of water before the storm. I'll sell you a case for $25."

Neighbor 3 overhears the conversation. "I was smart enough to buy a water filter a couple years ago. I'll refill those bottles for $15."

Neighbor 4 overhears the conversation. "I have a truck and boat that I can use to get supplies. I'll get you a case of water for $10."

See what happens? As demand increases, so do supplies.

I'll give you another, real world example. Almost forty years ago, the wealthy Hunt brothers tried to corner the market in silver. Silver went from $2 an ounce, up to $50. It looked like the Hunt brothers were going to add another fortune, to the fortune they already had.

But a funny thing happened. The supply of silver increased. People broke out their silver candle holders and silver serving sets, and sold them for many times what they had paid for them. The price of silver fell back to $8 an ounce, and the Hunt brothers ended up losing billions.

You just can't repeal the law of supply and demand. I'll say it again, price controls - and wage controls - don't work. Free market economics does.

Onward and upward,
airforce

Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160655
08/30/2017 10:03 AM
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Beaumont received over 50 inches of rain...26" of it yesterday. Beaumont and Port Arthur now under water. Looks like the entire southeastern part of Texas is turning into a giant lake.

They are now confirming 21 dead so far and expect the total to rise.

All 12,000 Texas NG deployed. And, they are calling up an additional 10,000 from other states.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160656
08/31/2017 03:02 AM
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Two Explosions Reported At Arkema Chemical Plant In Texas

“Once the chemicals begin to degrade we would be in a situation where we could be looking at a fire and/or an explosion.”

Zero Hedge - August 31, 2017

When the CEO of Arkema America, Richard Rowe, warned late Wednesday that the company is powerless to prevent an imminent explosion at its Crosby, TX chemical plant, all we could do was wait for the inevitable. We didn’t have long to wait, because just a few hours later, on Thursday morning, Arkema said it has been notified about two explosions at the doomed Crosby plant.

At approximately 2:00am local time, the company announced that two explosions and black smoke were reported. According to ABC, several people were taken to hospital.

Arkema confirming 2 explosions at their chemical plant + black smoke. EMS workers tell me people WERE taken to hospital. #abc13 pic.twitter.com/OI70b4UWH8

— Courtney Fischer (@CourtneyABC13) August 31, 2017

A sheriff’s deputy was among those taken to the hospital after inhaling fumes, according to a tweet from the Harris County Sheriff’s Office. Nine other deputies drove themselves to the hospital as a precaution.

One deputy taken to hospital after inhaling fumes from Archem plant in Crosby. 9 others drove themselves to hospital as precaution.

— HCSOTexas (@HCSOTexas) August 31, 2017

Arkema had already evacuated workers, and local authorities had cleared the area prior to the blow. From the statement:

At approximately 2 a.m. CDT, we were notified by the Harris County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) of two explosions and black smoke coming from the Arkema Inc. plant in Crosby, Texas. Local officials had previously established an evacuation zone in an area 1.5 miles from our plant, based on their assessment of the situation.

An Arkema spokesperson stated late Wednesday that a fire at the site was inevitable. “The fire will happen. It will resemble a gasoline fire. It will be explosive and intense in nature… as the temperature rises, the natural state of these materials will decompose. A white smoke will result, and that will catch fire. So the fire is imminent. The question is when,” spokesperson Janet Smith said.

[Linked Image]
The Arkema Inc. chemical plant on Aug. 30

Rachel Moreno, a spokeswoman for the county fire marshal’s office, said it is unclear whether all residents obeyed the evacuation order for the 1.5 mile radius of the plant, adding that the office has received an unconfirmed report of a woman who may still be in the evacuation zone.

The company also said it is working closely with federal, state and local authorities to manage the situation, according to a statement on its website.

As Arkema stores organic peroxides at several locations on the site, the threat of additional explosions remains, it said, adding that the best course of action is to let the fire burn itself out.

We have been working closely with public officials to manage the implications of this situation, and have communicated with the public the potential for product to explode and cause an intense fire. Organic peroxides are extremely flammable and, as agreed with public officials, the best course of action is to let the fire burn itself out.

We want local residents to be aware that product is stored in multiple locations on the site, and a threat of additional explosion remains. Please do not return to the area within the evacuation zone until local emergency response authorities announce it is safe to do so.

Organic peroxides are a family of compounds that are used in a wide range of applications, such as making pharmaceuticals and construction materials.

As a reminder, on Wednesday the company said it has “no way to prevent” a potentially large explosion and fire at its facility near Houston, after flooding due to Tropical Storm Harvey. The Arkema plant in Crosby, Texas, some 25 miles northeast of Houston, was evacuated late Tuesday. Working with authorities, the company also urged everyone within a mile and a half of the plant to evacuate, and shut down a stretch of Highway 90 that runs alongside the plant, which produces organic peroxides for things like acrylic-based paint.

“We have an unprecedented 6 feet of water throughout the plant,” Arkema’s North American operations Chief Executive Rich Rowe said in a teleconference Wednesday with reporters. Rowe said that the plant lost primary power and two emergency backup power sources, which led to a shutdown of “critical refrigeration needed for our materials.” He said that means those materials “could now explode and cause a subsequent and intense fire,” and added that “the high water that exists on site, and the lack of power, leave us with no way to prevent it.”

Rowe said about 300 people in all have been evacuated, but said it wasn’t a mandatory evacuation, so he’s not certain whether the 1.5-mile radius around the facility is currently devoid of people. He said it is mostly a rural area, so there are “a limited number of homes” within the area. Rowe said local officials told him the water level in the area could actually continue to rise over the course of the next three to six days, and as such Arkema, which is based in France, believes the chemicals will start to degrade well before that happens.

“And once the chemicals begin to degrade we would be in a situation where we could be looking at a fire and/or an explosion,” he said. As soon as the chemicals begin to degrade they start to “self-accelerate” in a type of no-turning-back mode, he added.

Rowe didn’t get specific about the amount of chemicals on site or just how big the blast might be, except to say that the analysis of the quantity of chemical is what led authorities to decide on the 1.5-mile evacuation zone they deemed appropriate.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160657
08/31/2017 06:38 AM
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McMedic  Offline
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Posts: 1,763
43/18
Health care crisis worsening.

Hospitals evacuating...

Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160658
09/02/2017 12:45 PM
09/02/2017 12:45 PM
Joined: Jan 2002
Posts: 22,911
Tulsa
airforce Online content
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airforce  Online Content
Administrator
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Joined: Jan 2002
Posts: 22,911
Tulsa
It says something that the only thing the Democrats can criticize Trump for is... his wife's shoes.

Onward and upward,
airforce

Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160659
09/03/2017 02:53 AM
09/03/2017 02:53 AM
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,340
A 059 Btn 16 FF MSC
ConSigCor Online content OP
Senior Member
ConSigCor  Online Content OP
Senior Member
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,340
A 059 Btn 16 FF MSC
Quote
The storm is expected to be one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history, displacing more than 1 million people and leaving behind wreckage in an area stretching more than 300 miles that officials said would take years to repair.

Some areas of Texas received more than 50 inches (127 cm) of rain and the storm led to the deaths of at least 46 people.

The devastation from the unprecedented flooding to the Houston metropolitan area, with an economy as large as Argentina's, has been enormous. As of Saturday morning, nearly 200,000 homes have suffered flood damage and about 12,600 were destroyed, according to the Texas Department of Public Safety.

Floodwaters of 18 inches or more once covered more than 70 percent of Harris County,

Many areas still were battling floodwaters from swollen rivers that were expected to last for a week or more. In Beaumont, about 85 miles (137 km) east, officials were trying to repair a flood-damaged pumping station that caused the city of about 120,000 people to lose drinking water about three days ago.

The storm shut about a fourth of U.S. refinery capacity, much of which is clustered along the Gulf Coast, and caused gasoline prices to spike to a two-year high ahead of the long Labor Day holiday weekend.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160660
09/03/2017 03:06 AM
09/03/2017 03:06 AM
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 381
San Antonio, TX
Mexneck Offline
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Mexneck  Offline
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Posts: 381
San Antonio, TX
In San Antonio gas prices are now at $2.50+ per gallon if you can find gas. There are very few stations that actually have gas and there are police stationed at these gas stations. Lines can be 20 cars deep. Very few cars are on the road compared to a typical San Antonio weekend. Oath Keepers is the only site reporting on the looting and robbing in Houston and surrounding cities. I was hoping that TR and others near the Houston area could give us an update.


Well, this is it.
Re: Hurricane Harvey Disaster Texas #160661
09/03/2017 08:55 AM
09/03/2017 08:55 AM
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,340
A 059 Btn 16 FF MSC
ConSigCor Online content OP
Senior Member
ConSigCor  Online Content OP
Senior Member
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,340
A 059 Btn 16 FF MSC
Heard this morning that the Exxon refinery is back online. The day the pipeline shut down 87 octane gas jumped to $2.49 here. Ninety octane straight gas is $3.33.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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