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Major Fires At Key Food Industry Facilities In The U.S. #178028
04/26/2022 01:08 AM
04/26/2022 01:08 AM
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A List Of 16 Major Fires That Have Occurred At Key Food Industry Facilities In The U.S. Since The Start Of 2022

April 21, 2022 by Michael


Can anyone explain why absolutely massive fires just keep erupting again and again at critical facilities all over America? The tragic destruction by fire of the headquarters of Azure Standard in Oregon shocked millions of people, and since that news broke quite a few readers have been reaching out to me about the long string of unusual blazes that we have been witnessing from coast to coast in recent months. I decided to look into this phenomenon for myself, and I am sharing what I have discovered so far in this article. Dr. Benjamin Braddock and others had already been digging into this, and their research proved quite valuable as I began my investigation. Some of the incidents that people have reported I was not able to independently verify, and others I felt were too minor to be put on this list. With all that being said, the following is a list of 16 major fires that have occurred at key food industry facilities in the U.S. since the start of 2022…

#1 Salinas, California

As the smoke settles near Taylor Farms, questions remain on the future of the business and the roughly 1,000 people employed at the Abbott Street facility.

There is little to nothing left of the processing facility due to fire and smoke damages caused by Wednesday night’s blaze, according to Deputy Fire Chief Sam Klemek.

“About 85% to 95% of the building is a total loss,” he said.

#2 Hermiston, Oregon

Multiple workers are hospitalized following an explosion at a food processing facility that has nearby residents on alert for possible evacuation.

The explosion occurred Tuesday evening at Shearer’s Foods in Hermiston, a city in agriculturally rich eastern Oregon. No deaths have been reported from the blast, but the extent of the damage to the plant and its future were not clear. City officials are concerned what the fire could mean for the community and local economy.

#3 Conway, New Hampshire

Neighbors banded together to support crews as they battled a fire in Conway for about 16 hours Monday night.

More than 12 departments and agencies worked together to put out the fire at East Conway Beef and Pork.

#4 San Juan, Texas

On March 31, 2022, a structure fire significantly damaged a large portion of the largest fresh onion packing facilities in South Texas.

#5 Jonesboro, Arkansas

“The situation at our Jonesboro factory is under control and we are looking into the cause of the fire,” a Nestle spokesperson said. “Thankfully, no employees were injured and all are safe. We appreciate the quick response of the Jonesboro Fire Department and emergency response teams. The factory will remain closed as we assess the damage and return the factory to full operation. We plan to continue to support our employees financially during this time.”

Nestle opened the plant in 2002 and in December 2020 the company unveiled plans to invest more than $100 million to expand the frozen foods plant, including the addition of 90,000 square feet and a new production line for Hot Pockets frozen sandwiches. In addition to Hot Pockets, Nestle makes products under the Stouffer’s, Lean Cuisine, DiGiorno, Tombstone and Sweet Earth brands at the plant.

#6 Mauston, Wisconsin

A portion of Mauston’s Wisconsin River Meats burnt down during an overnight fire Feb. 2-3, with the cause of the fire still under investigation.

“The old portion of the plant is a total loss,” Wisconsin River Meats said in a Facebook post about the fire. “We humbly ask that you be patient and please give us some time to sort out the cause of the fire and for us to transition some of our business and invoicing to our warehouse.”

#7 Fayetteville, Illinois

Operating from what company officials referred to as the command center at Deli Star Corp.’s St. Louis Innovation Center, the Siegel family-led operations and executive team have spent the week scrambling to fulfill customers’ orders and work with local officials investigating a Jan. 11 fire that destroyed its 75,000-square-foot processing plant in Fayetteville, about 40 miles southeast of them.

#8 Belfast, Maine

Fire crews from several towns have been battling a fire at the Penobscot McCrum potato processing plant in Belfast. Crews were called to the scene at 28 Pierce Street around 3:30 a.m., according to Maine Department of Public Safety spokesperson Shannon Moss.

#9 Leoti, Kansas

A fire at a fertilizer company in western Kansas prompted evacuations Tuesday afternoon because hazardous materials were involved, officials said.

The Ford County Regional Hazardous Materials Team deployed to Leoti for the fire and was fighting the blaze and removing hazardous material, Wichita County Clerk Lynda Goodrich said.

#10 Claypool, Indiana

Louis Dreyfus Company (LDC) said on Wednesday a fire had broken out in a bag house at its Claypool, Indiana, soybean processing and biodiesel plant on Tuesday and the affected systems had been suspended.

No employees were injured and the fire was put out by 9:15 p.m. central time on Tuesday, LDC said in a statement. LDC’s website said soybean deliveries were suspended at the plant on Wednesday. LDC says Claypool is the largest fully integrated soybean processing and biodiesel plant in the United States.

#11 Winston-Salem, Carolina

An uncontrolled fire at a fertilizer plant in North Carolina forced thousands of people to evacuate as firefighters stood back Tuesday because of the danger of a large explosion.

Authorities drove through neighborhoods and knocked on doors asking residents to leave within a one-mile radius (1.6 km) of the Winston Weaver Company fertilizer plant on the north side of Winston-Salem, where the fire started Monday night. Overnight, bright orange flames and thick plumes of smoke could be seen shooting into the sky. No injuries were reported.

#12 Sunnyside, Washington

A smoldering pile of sulfur quickly became a raging chemical fire just after 1 p.m. Monday at Nutrien Ag Solutions, 1101 Midvale Road, Sunnyside Fire Chief Ken Anderson said.

The fire destroyed one storage building on the southeast corner of the fertilizer storage facility in the Port of Sunnyside and damaged others, but adjacent Nutrien buildings and storage tanks containing hazardous chemicals were spared, Anderson said Monday evening.

#13 Lecompte, Louisiana

A fire started at the Cargill-Nutrena feed mill in Lecompte, LA in the early hours of Thursday morning and burned for 12 hours, coverage by local television news station KALB said. An explosion reportedly occurred as firefighters were working the scene.

#14 Maricopa, Arizona

It’s a long road to recovery for Maricopa Food Pantry after a fire destroyed around 50,000 lb of food. The fire happened just 15 minutes after their food bank closed on Monday morning. Smoke was still coming from the rubble 24 hours later. “It had to be 40-50 feet in the air, just pure black smoke. It engulfed the entire neighborhood,” said Maricopa Food Pantry President Mike Connelly. “The heat we could feel down at the corner.”

#15 Dufur, Oregon

The headquarters of Azure Standard, the nation’s premier independent distributor of organic and healthy food, was destroyed by fire overnight. There were no injuries. The cause of the fire is unknown and under investigation. The loss of the facility and the impact on companywide operations is being assessed and expected to be limited and temporary. No other Azure Standard facilities were affected.

#16 Planfield, Indiana

Investigators from the ATF’s National Response Team began its on-scene investigation on Friday into the massive fire at a Walmart facility in Plainfield.

The team, led by Supervisor Christopher Forkner, is working with the Plainfield Fire Territory, Indiana State Fire Marshal’s Office and the Plainfield Police Department, according to a press release. ATF special agents from the Indianapolis Offices of the Columbus Field Division will also be assisting.

Of course it is not unusual for there to be fires at food industry facilities, and fire departments are accustomed to responding to such fires and putting them out.

But in many of these cases, we are talking about absolutely uncontrollable fires that seemed to erupt very suddenly.

And in many of these cases the firefighters that responded were not able to save the structures because the fires were so enormous.

Needless to say, the collective loss of all of these facilities will make the coming food shortages that I have extensively written about quite a bit worse.

If you come across more reports that are similar to the ones in this list, please feel free to send them my way.

I am going to continue to dig into this mystery, and the American people certainly deserve some answers.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Major Fires At Key Food Industry Facilities In The U.S. [Re: ConSigCor] #178029
04/26/2022 01:10 AM
04/26/2022 01:10 AM
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ConSigCor Offline OP
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Why Are So Many Mysterious Fires Happening At Food Processing Facilities All Across The United States?
April 24, 2022 by Michael


Everyone can see that something really strange appears to be happening, and now even Tucker Carlson is talking about it on television. For months, unusual fires have been erupting at important food industry facilities all over America. Last Thursday, I put together a list of 16 major fires that have occurred just since the start of the year. Unfortunately, since I wrote that article a couple more “mysterious incidents” have taken place. Very early on Saturday, firefighters were called out to battle a fire at a General Mills facility in Cedar Rapids, Iowa…

An early morning fire at General Mills led first responders to the roof of the company to attack the flames from above. The call came in around 3:45am on Saturday at the plant located at 4800 Edgewood Road SW. First responders discovered hot spots where a vent stack makes contact with the roof.

Steam and smoke were already visible. Crews reached the roof and confirmed the location of the fire below them with the help of thermal imaging. Firefighters removed roofing material and found the flames working their way through the ceiling and traveling with the vent stack.

Oddly, this fire erupted less than 48 hours after a plane crashed at a General Mills facility in Covington, Georgia…

Investigators spent Friday at the General Mills plant in Covington combing through the wreckage of a deadly plane crash that happened the previous evening.

A twin-engine Cessna crashed into several semi trailers at remote part of the cereal plant on Thursday evening killing two people, the Covington Police Department said.

Is it just a “coincidence” that there were two major disasters at General Mills facilities within 48 hours of one another?

That is what some would have us believe.

Of course there have been a whole bunch of other “coincidences” happening lately too.

Less than a week ago, the headquarters of Azure Standard burned to the ground in a massive fire. CEO David Stelzer is admitting that all Azure Market liquid products will be out of stock for the foreseeable future as a result…

He also added, “For our customers, three primary product groups are affected due to the destroyed automated liquid pour facility, fruit packing facilities and carob products facilities.” He continued, “Because of this, we will experience out-of-stock status for Azure Market oils, honey and vinegars – basically any Azure Market liquid product – as well as our carob products for the short term. We are not yet at fruit harvest, so no immediate impact will be experienced from the loss of our fruit packing facility. None of the products we distribute for our vendors will be affected,” he concluded.

And just a few days before that, a “four-alarm fire” destroyed a very important food processing facility in Salinas, California…

Authorities Thursday lifted all evacuation and shelter-in-place orders in an area of Salinas where a four-alarm fire sparked a day earlier at a food processing plant, prompting fears of a possible explosion and hazardous plume of ammonia, city officials said.

The fire was initially reported at about 7:15 p.m. Wednesday at the Taylor Farms processing facility on Abbott Street and prompted an order early Thursday for evacuations affecting an estimated 2,700 people and a shelter-in-place order affecting an estimated 35,000 people.

If these were isolated incidents, perhaps we never would have even taken notice of them.

But they aren’t isolated incidents.

In fact, fires have been mysteriously erupting at America’s food processing facilities for many months.

[img]https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FRCa4HVXEAAQQnv?format=jpg&name=small[/img]

Strangely, the latest fires happened during the same week that the FBI admitted that America’s farmers are now being specifically targeted by ransomware attacks…

A new warning right now for local farmers.

The FBI says you need to be on alert for ransomware attacks. As KDKA money editor Jon Delano explains, those attacks on farmers could impact the rest of us at the grocery store.

Whether it’s a dairy or poultry farm, a cattle farm, or a farm that grows grain, farming is a key part of Pennsylvania’s economy.

Could there be some relation between these two stories?

For now, the FBI is not saying.

And most of the talking heads on television are assuring us that there is nothing to be concerned about and that everything will be just fine.

Meanwhile, more fires continue to make the news.

On Sunday, it was being reported that “nearly a dozen wildfires” had just roared through key agricultural areas of Nebraska…

Sunday was far from a day of rest for firefighters across much of the state, as they continued to mop up nearly a dozen wildfires and remained alert for more.

By Sunday morning, the Road 702 Fire in the Cambridge area covered 50,000 acres — a much larger area than the 33,000 acres burned in the April 7-9 fire in Gosper and Furnas counties. A management team from the Rocky Mountain area took command of the battle at 7 a.m. Sunday morning.

And a total of 20 wildfires are ripping across New Mexico as I write this article…

New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham has signed emergency declarations as 20 wildfires continued to burn Sunday in nearly half of the state’s drought-stricken 33 counties.

I don’t know how all of the things that I have discussed in this article tie together.

But what I do know is that all of them will have an impact on our food supply.

As I have discussed previously, UN officials are warning that we are heading into the worst global food crisis since World War II.

Do you remember when millions of people died of starvation in the 1980s and there were endless appeals on television asking us to give to the hungry?

Well, authorities are telling us that what is coming is going to be much worse than that.

A “perfect storm” of factors is combining to create the greatest stress on global food supplies that we have seen in modern times.

But most of the talking heads on television want you to believe that everything is under control and that better times are just around the corner.

You can believe them if you want, but my recommendation is to get prepared for this crisis while you still can.


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Major Fires At Key Food Industry Facilities In The U.S. [Re: ConSigCor] #178034
04/26/2022 05:01 PM
04/26/2022 05:01 PM
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,243
A 059 Btn 16 FF MSC
ConSigCor Offline OP
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ConSigCor  Offline OP
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A 059 Btn 16 FF MSC


"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861
Re: Major Fires At Key Food Industry Facilities In The U.S. [Re: ConSigCor] #178035
04/26/2022 05:53 PM
04/26/2022 05:53 PM
Joined: Jan 2002
Posts: 22,683
Tulsa
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airforce  Online Content
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Tulsa
Is anyone really surprised the USDA is just as corrupt as everyone else in government? It's one thing to not trust the FBI, but when you can't even trust the food in your supermarket, well...

Onward and upward,
airforce


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