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The Basics of Stocking a Retreat for One Year #98446
07/13/2006 12:41 PM
07/13/2006 12:41 PM
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Posted by: ConSigCor May 19 2006, 06:07 PM
The Basics of Stocking a Retreat For One Year, by Buckshot

Remember the movie Red Dawn? Think about when Colonel Tanner said: "You think you're tough for eating beans every day? The scarecrows in Denver would give anything for a taste of what you got. They've been under siege for about three months. They live on rats and on sawdust and sometimes... on each other. At night, the pyres for the dead light up the sky. It's medieval." Do you have a plan set up to keep you and your family from become scare crows? I mean a realistic plan that you are working on every payday?

A good friend once told me. My place is going to have one foot thick concrete walls, solar, wind, and a positive air system to filter out all nuclear, biological, chemical attacks. Solid steel doors and steel shutters. That is all fine and good but do you have the $100,000 to build it? Ah no? It is far better to have a 12x12 hunting camp with a hand pump well, kerosene lights, a wood stove, and a propane cookstove than a dream retreat that never got built. Start with the basic stuff first the Five Bs: Building, bullets, beans, bacon, and buckshot.

An apartment size propane cookstove with a small oven is very efficient. Normal everyday usage is from 2 to 5 gallons a month. Five gallons of propane is commonly called a 20 pound cylinder. You can get two 25 gallon cylinders (100 pound) and hook up with automatic switch over when the first tank is empty it switches to the full tank. Hook up to a propane stove and you have one year supply of cooking for a family of four. This is just an estimate--your results may vary. Now this is not a camp stove but a regular looking small apartment size propane kitchen stove.

What about light for a year? If you use a Dietz lantern for light and use it 4 hours each night you will need how many gallons a year? 26 hours per fill up on I believe is 22 ounces, 128 ounces in a gallon, one gallon will give 150.8 hours of light or 37.7 days per gallon. A little less then 10 gallons of lamp oil or kerosene per year. Plus extra wicks and at least one spare globe. You can burn kerosene it is cheaper then lamp oil but it smells. Make sure you test it before depending on it. That means kill the lights for 1 hour and burn it and see if you can handle the smell. Please be careful with a lit flame in your house around children, pets and anything flammable.

The most important thing to have on your property beside owning it free and clear is a drilled well. Hauling water is for the birds. I have advised many people it's better to own five acres with a well than forty acres without one. Water is vital and after the first few days of hauling water more then ten feet it become old, tiring, and a dreaded chore. They say each person uses seventy gallons a day that includes, cooking, drinking, flushing the toilet, and showers. You can get by with ten gallons a day pretty good except when you wash clothes. A solar shower sold in camping supply stores are a great thing to have. Fill it in the morning place where the sun can reach it and you have a hot shower.

A drain field for most states requirement for a drain field for even a small cabin is a ridiculous price ranging from $6,000 to $20,000 to meet new strict codes. Before you buy property make sure you find out the cost. Normal problems are typically found in the blue states with too many bureaucrats. Some states are so strict they will not allow National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) approved composting toilets. That is a clear indication it is time to vote with your feet and move to a red state. If you can use a basic composting toilet, a sink, a shower drain hooked to a small drain field. It works great.

If you do have a well on your property there are lots of ways to get water from windmills, hand pumps and solar power pumps. Water is a requirement that you need every single day. So, the first thing you need on any property is a well.

Are you heating with wood? How much wood do you need to get through a winter? Depends on the size of the building, how well insulated, where you live and how efficient your stove is. Cheap $100 wood stoves are for the birds. Get a better airtight stove. Buy the better thicker pipe, buy the cleaning rods and brush, if you have a chimney fire how do you put it out. There is a couple of ways you can set up a chimney cab that slams shuts on the top. This cuts off the vent and air or another way is they sell a item that looks like a road flare you can toss in your wood stove that is suppose to put it out. I have not tested either. But have cleaned my pipes and chimney every year. I don't burn pine or fir or cedar. If you do burn soft resinous wood like pine I recommend you clean your chimney once a month. Another safely precaution is a metal roof it might just save your house from burning to the ground if you ever do have a chimney fire. If you have never had a chimney fire they say it sounds like a tornado shooting up the chimney and flames shooting straight up 4-5 feet or more. Normally they happen in the coldest nasty weather because people really fire up the stove then. Might just ruin your whole winter to watch your retreat burn to the ground. Hopefully you have smoke detectors and everyone made it out safe. Be careful wood stoves can be dangerous.

Get a good chain saw like a Husqvarna 141. They are good on gas not too heavy and very reliable. Extra chains, spare bar, spark plugs, pull cord, sharpening files at least 6, and air filters. Maybe a spare electronic ignition brain. You will need 5 gallons of chain and bar oil, or in an emergency you can use used motor oil. 10 gallons of gas per year and enough 2 cycle mixing oil for the gas. Now how are you going to haul the wood back to the cabin? A 2 wheel cart is one way. Splitting mauls make sure you buy them with fiberglass or steel handles. Axes with fiberglass handles same with rakes and shovels use fiberglass handles. You are going to need safety goggles and plenty of leather work gloves. Cutting down standing trees is dangerous if you never handled a chain saw before it might be a good idea to go out with a trusted friend and have him teach you the safe use of dropping trees and chain saw use.

Okay, so far we have talked about a small hunting camp with a metal roof heated with wood, a propane cooking stove for summer cooking, a well, compost toilet with a small drain field for sink and shower, good tools, etc. Now what else? Just the basics of what you will need. A .22 rifle with a good scope and 1000 rounds of ammo, a 12 gauge pump shotgun--I prefer the Remington 870--with assorted shells: slugs, buckshot and bird shot, a good hunting rifle, at least a .308 with a good Leupold scope and 160 rounds for it.

Now what else? gill nets, four dozen assorted snares , extra matches, good flints, traps, garden seeds, a way to can or dry and store food. Flashlights, in 9 volts like the PAL Light which is great because it is has a always on feature that last two years on one battery. The solar yard lights are fairly cheap come with AA Batteries that can be put in to use in other flashlights. Or remove the batteries at dusk place back in the day and recharge again. Lots to do with that idea. Use your head. Having a working flashlight 6 months into a real emergency is God sent. Worst comes to worst you can use them inside for your night lights.

A year supply of food. A good basic storage assortment with just the essentials and don't forget a wheat grinder so you can grind flour. This is written for a single person or small family that would want to live at their deer camp for one year. I am not even getting into retreat defense or other assorted guns [and the amount f ammo required for that]. As I have stated in another article if I was going to be in a thick wooded area give me a Browning Buckmark .22 [pistol] and a good old reliable .30-30 Winchester.

First aid. Don't forget spare eye glasses, chap stick, Vaseline, prescription medicine, super glue, tweezers, Advil, aspirin, assorted Band-Aids, gauze, wraps, antiseptic, etcetera. Make the kit according to your family needs.

Make sure you cover the basic needs first. What good is 12,000 rounds of ammo, two battle rifles, BDUs, one flashlight, and one case of MREs after the first week? You must have a full plan to survive. Providing for just one year takes some serious dedication to reach that level. A couple of decks of cards, pens, papers, small note books, the list can go on and on and on. You have to be well rounded. Can you skin a buck, run a trap line, drop a tree with a chain saw, plant a garden, protect your garden, preserve your food? Do you have dogs? Do you have enough stored food for them? How about pest control, mice traps, squirrels, rabbits, coons, ground hogs, can sure tear up a garden do you have traps for them? Think it through: Chipmunks, gophers, garden pest, and bug control. Mosquito netting is the best thing you can buy if you plan on being outdoors.

Sit down and try to put a list together for one year of supplies. You know just the basics like where are you going to get water every day. How are you going to cook? How do you heat in the winter? Have you ever tried to chop a years supply of wood? Do you have children? What kind of medicine will you need for them in 1 year? What kind of non power games do you have for them to do? Does you wife sew or crotchet? Do you have some supplies like that put away. A knitted wool hat or mittens sure would be nice if you didn't have them when you left. How about washing clothes? One way that works ok is to take 5-6 gallon buckets and cut a small hole in the center of the lid just big enough for a toilet plunger. Fill 3/4 ways with water add soap (you did remember laundry soap for a year right?) add clothes for about one person pants, shirt t-shirt, under wear and socks, plunged for 1 minute let soak for 5 minutes plunge again for 10 seconds. Dump out water, fill with fresh water again plunge for 1 minute dump out, fill again with clean water plunge for 1 minute dump out. Hand wring the clothes, hang out to dry or hang near wood stove in the winter to dry. Again be careful you don't allow clothes to get to close to the wood stove or you have a fire hazard.

You did put away enough toilet paper for a year, right? You also protected this toilet paper with traps or poison so the mice and chipmunks didn't chew it all, up right? How about feminine products for a year. What about yeast infections? I know not the most pleasant thing to talk about but a must if you are seriously planning to survive. I talked to an old timer once that grew up in the Depression and I asked him what did you use for toilet paper his words "Last year Sears and Roebuck catalog, oh and by the way I sold all my furs to them too." What would be a good catalog today? How about some thick old city telephone books, might be a good choice to store away for back up toilet paper.

I did this the old fashioned way through hard knocks. Trust me, the first time you have to haul water for 100 yards you will wish you spent the money for a well. When your Coleman lantern runs out of fuel or breaks, you will wish you had a Dietz lantern back up. When your splitting maul wooden handle breaks you will wish you had spent the extra money for fiberglass. When your ammunition is damp and unreliable you will wish you'd spent the $5.00 each for used ammo cans. Trust me, I learned these all the hard way and still had the luxury of running to store for replacement supplies. When I say I tested everything that is what I mean and along the way I had several lessons learn the hard way. Having a fully stocked retreat is a comfort. Having tested everything yourself it gives you experience and know how.

Lots to think about. You will be glad that you put up a year supply of food, it sure will make a welcome sight every morning instead of surviving like scare crows eating sawdust and rats, that is brown rats not the good tasting marsh rabbit--what most folks call muskrats. :-). When you have water, heat, a cook stove, and roof over your head life will seem pretty good. Lots to do when you sit down and really look at what it takes to survive with just the basics for one year. Don't waste your time worrying, get to work. After you take care of the basics then you can move forward with more advanced plans. - Buckshot

From James Wesley Rawles SurvivalBlog.com

Posted by: SPIKEpilot May 21 2006, 01:26 PM
Good article.

I'd like to add that whatever propane stove/oven you get, make sure that is has a non-electric igniter.

The dietz lanterns work, but don't put out much more than a night light. If you can afford it, Aladdin lanterns put out superior lighting equivelent to a 60 watt bulb.

For water, set up a collection & filter system using your home gutter & drain. Rain collection in these can literally be a lifesaver & make life a heck of a lot more comfortable.

As far as garden seeds go, make sure you get non-hybrid seeds, so you can collect new seeds for next planting season.

From experience as well.

Re: The Basics of Stocking a Retreat for One Year #98447
11/12/2006 12:35 AM
11/12/2006 12:35 AM
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Well said...


"I am constantly on the move. Thats how I make my money. If you get an email from me asking to meet with you it is time sensitive. It will give the expiration information in it. I have had all my shots so no worries." -AVDRT Recruiter / Trainer
Re: The Basics of Stocking a Retreat for One Year #98448
11/26/2006 07:21 AM
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This is GREAT! I'm "cut'n & paste'n'!

I'd just like to slightly revise your "12X12 Hunting Camp" description: It's FAR better to have such a Hut established on a "firewood" & "Natural" heating & cooling basis. A Wood Stove would heat a 12X12, EASILY.

The BASIC necessities are "RICKS" or "cordes"
[4'long X 4'high X 21/1'wide piles] (for a yr., no less than 12 "ricks"/"cordes", or a 48' long X 4' high, by 21/2' wide stack. Have it ABOVE the ground, (2") and COMPLETELY covered, preferably in a shed. In a shed, tho, the pile would be HIGHER, & SHORTER...preferably 8' to 12' high, by 5' to 10' deep[wide](which would be two to four logs deep). [make sure you have 'rat traps', & screen off the ventilation BELOW the pile, against snakes]. Weather proof the shed, & leave one side open, for BOTH esay access, as well as "weathering/curing" your wood. cut & "cure" for a yr. prior to use, if possible.] Also, "HARD wood" [Oak, Ceder] for LONG night burns, "soft Wood"[Pine] for cooking, and short intense burns, & combine for cooking, also. LEARN YOUR WOOD TYPES!

I KNOW because I lived in a Single wide for five Tenn. Appleacian Mountain Winters with one wood stove heating our 28'X 12'home. It took a little asjusting, but, it was EASILY "doable".

Again, a slight revision: The Wood Stove we had, also doubled as our cook stove. Worked GREAT, after we adapted & ajusted to it's varient heat factors. Just takes practice...(which should be done when you can keep the windows open to remove the smoke your MISTAKES create(ha!).

Your point on the import of a "DRILLED WELL", is EMMENSE(as OBVIOUSLY you know), and CANNOT BE OVER EMPHASIZED! Our property was bordered by a small & vibrant creek(river in rainy season). It provided AMPLE supply of water, year round. BUT!! What F_A_R too few realize is:
#1]WATER is a heavy substance for "porting"
#2]N_O,(EMPHASIS ON N_O_T ANY)pottable(drinkable) water exists in the USCON, without PURIFICATION!(due to animal feces, dead bocies, & sewage "creep", as well as "water table" pollution by "INDUSTRIAL SEEPAGE". BE AWARE & DO YOUR HOME WORK, before simply "drinking". "drilled" or "fre flow", it A_L_L needs purification filtering.

Another factor are those "RESTRICTIONS" you warn about.

The ideal location is in an "UNRESTRICTED" area. AND, you're DEAD ON the head about checking on the "drain field" expenses, BEFORE buying property. It's a "HIDDEN" cost. And, a SERIOUS one.

As I mentioned, heating with a wood stove is NOT that difficult. I'm handicapped, & a smallish build. NO PROB. The "chain saw" is A MAJOR value item, but, honestly, gas/oil W_I_L_L_ run out, so you'd BETTER have a SERIOUS knowlege of Axes, saws, & sharpening methods, aw well as chopping & "felling" methods. S_T_U_D_Y NOW! (Don Paul's PATH FINDER PUBLICATIONS is a GOOD start: His "Knife Bible" is chalk full of SF info! tried & proven...I K_N_O_W because it got me thru 5 DIFFICULT Winters!)

There's F_A_R MORE info needed, but this is a GENUINELY FULL BRIEF! GOOD STUFF! THANKS!


"KNOW THY ENEMY"..."He who fails to learn from History, is doomed to repeat it's errors"..."For we wrestle not against flesh & blood..."..."Quitters NEVER win, & winners NEVER quit!"
Re: The Basics of Stocking a Retreat for One Year #98449
12/01/2006 10:10 PM
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A native guide to eatable plant life (with pictures)and ways of presurving meat is a good idea to. another thing to keep in mined is not to build your fire too big and be careful of what you burn, a tower of smoke 200 feet in the air is a good way to draw attention to yourself. Ive found that native american indain survival books and online books on indians, everything in them is useful info. Try looking up the life styles of the indian tribes from your area, you might be suprised not every indian lived in a ti pi, that was the plains indian mostly. Ther are some good shelters in ther. http://www.3k88.com/arts_crafts_skills.htm


remember the batard bastards of bastogne
Re: The Basics of Stocking a Retreat for One Year #98450
12/04/2006 06:01 AM
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Hey, ConSigCor, Would I be able to add this to my sites featured articles?


The Ridge Runner
http://mvcr.yolasite.com
Blow, wind! come, wrack!
At least we'll die with harness on our back.
Macbeth. Act v. Sc. 5.
Re: The Basics of Stocking a Retreat for One Year #98451
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You should store at least 1.5 pounds of highly concentrated edibles and 1 gallon of drinking water plus 1 gallon of fuel per person per day...


I believe in absolute Freedom, as little interference from any government as possible...And I'll fight any man trying to take that away from me.

Jimmy Greywolf
Re: The Basics of Stocking a Retreat for One Year #98452
07/10/2007 07:39 PM
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A water purifier is a good investment. These are good ones and can be taken with ya. Once you have it you can use lake water, pond water, and river water. Endless supply as long as you can keep the filters clean. It's easy with the Berkey's. I own a "Berkey Light".

http://www.berkeywater.com/start.main.html

[img]http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t223/APatriot2/big_berkey_pitcher_new.jpg?t=1184135859[/img]

As you can clearly see, the top is the pond water and the bottom is the purified water reservoir(sp?). wink


"In the beginning of a change the patriot is a scarce man, and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot". Mark Twain - 1904
Re: The Basics of Stocking a Retreat for One Year #98453
01/10/2008 04:47 PM
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Excellent intel. Sometimes we can forget it 'aint all about how many bullets you have stored. You have to eat, drink and stay warm to survive.


"Every man of you who is equipped, follow me..Stand your ground. Don't fire unless fired upon. But if they want to have a war, let it begin here."

CAPTAIN JOHN PARKER (Commander, Lexington Militia Company)
Re: The Basics of Stocking a Retreat for One Year #98454
05/27/2008 10:29 AM
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A drain field for most states requirement for a drain field for even a small cabin is a ridiculous price ranging from $6,000 to $20,000 to meet new strict codes.

For those who aren't in the know, an expedient drain field can be made. I know of guys who had hunting camps who wanted a place to drain gray water (not sewage, more wash water).

Hole dug deep enough to bury a 55gal drum. Drill 1" holes all over the stinkin place on the barrel. (or maybe now would be a good time to see how that new rifle works and shoot it all up smile place the now holy barrel in the ground. The hole should place top of barrel at least 2ft down from the ground surface (I think my buddies was 3') Now take the bung off,,,thats the threaded plug on top and plan on spending an afternoon doing the most boring job ever. Placing a pipe over hole into barrel and filling it with 1/2" stone. This may take a while. Fill barrel almost to top. Thread pipe if you haven't already to the top of barrel that will stick up past the surface. fill back in with any left over stone around endges of barrel and then fill hole with dirt. These guys had pipes running from camp sink into this "drain field"

I suppose a slightly bigger one could be made, but these weren't used on any type of constant use basis. Heck the water that these ever saw probably never added up to more than 50 gallons in a weekend, so plenty of time to leach into the ground until next month or longer till hunting again.

Yes, the township REALLY frowns on this, but in a SHTF scenario do you think the building inspector is going to see if you have permits? He may very well be in the next camp over doing the same thing!

hope this helps


Bona na Croin- Neither Collar nor Crown

"Free where I live or die where I stand"
Re: The Basics of Stocking a Retreat for One Year #98455
05/27/2008 04:50 PM
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A good way to reduce your water usage is to take a 1-gallon milk jug, poke a small hole in it near the bottom. Now plug that hole with a golf tee. To avoid losing the golf tee, attach it to a string tied to the jug's handle.

This is a great camp gadget, especially with Boy Scouts, since children are usually especially wasteful of water. I know a guy who says he can take a shower with 1/2 a gallon from one of these things.


On equipment: You get what you inspect, not what you expect.
On training: Our drills are bloodless battles so that our battles are bloody drills.
On tactics: Cheating just means you're serious about winning.
Re: The Basics of Stocking a Retreat for One Year #98456
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Quote
Originally posted by SGTBloodLoss:
A good way to reduce your water usage is to take a 1-gallon milk jug, poke a small hole in it near the bottom. Now plug that hole with a golf tee. To avoid losing the golf tee, attach it to a string tied to the jug's handle. This is a great camp gadget, especially with Boy Scouts, since children are usually especially wasteful of water.
Put a bar of soap into a lady’s nylon stocking and tie it to the side of the jug. It will keep the soap from getting lost or dirty. The nylon also acts as a scrub pad for those really dirty hands.


Quote

I know a guy who says he can take a shower with 1/2 a gallon from one of these things.
And you could smell him coming ½ hour before he got there.


Rudy out
"Once the pin is pulled, Mr. Handgrenade is no longer our friend."
Re: The Basics of Stocking a Retreat for One Year #98457
05/28/2008 08:45 AM
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Good idea about the soap & stocking, I'll keep that in mind.


On equipment: You get what you inspect, not what you expect.
On training: Our drills are bloodless battles so that our battles are bloody drills.
On tactics: Cheating just means you're serious about winning.
Re: The Basics of Stocking a Retreat for One Year #98458
06/24/2009 02:14 PM
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I am finally done.... I have completed my stocking, fuel supplies and all other needs. I can go off the grid at anytime now. Damn that feels good. I won't go into amounts but I have exceeded recommended levels. I have bought a solar pump for my well, plus generators for running power, with solar back up. Damn I am happy... I may have finished just in time.
For those who think they have plenty of time. I joined the militia movement the 90's and I did prepare then. but after the mid 90's I decided to move from the Vegas area to the mountains again.I wanted to live like my grandfather did in Dickenson county Virginia did, FREE!!! I has taken most of that time to get a place, build a farm and stock. buy weapons and ammo, make my place secure, cache, the last 4 years I have been stocking my survival equiptment and supplies, and trying to remove myself from the grid.
So you better get started it is not as easy as you think. It takes perseverance and some sacrificing. I have it all documented. unbelievable amount of work, but worth it.


I believe in absolute Freedom, as little interference from any government as possible...And I'll fight any man trying to take that away from me.

Jimmy Greywolf
Re: The Basics of Stocking a Retreat for One Year #98459
09/20/2009 03:43 PM
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Quote
Originally posted by Bona_na_Croin:
A drain field for most states requirement for a drain field for even a small cabin is a ridiculous price ranging from $6,000 to $20,000 to meet new strict codes.

For those who aren't in the know, an expedient drain field can be made. I know of guys who had hunting camps who wanted a place to drain gray water (not sewage, more wash water).

Hole dug deep enough to bury a 55gal drum. Drill 1" holes all over the stinkin place on the barrel. (or maybe now would be a good time to see how that new rifle works and shoot it all up smile place the now holy barrel in the ground. The hole should place top of barrel at least 2ft down from the ground surface (I think my buddies was 3') Now take the bung off,,,thats the threaded plug on top and plan on spending an afternoon doing the most boring job ever. Placing a pipe over hole into barrel and filling it with 1/2" stone. This may take a while. Fill barrel almost to top. Thread pipe if you haven't already to the top of barrel that will stick up past the surface. fill back in with any left over stone around endges of barrel and then fill hole with dirt. These guys had pipes running from camp sink into this "drain field"

I suppose a slightly bigger one could be made, but these weren't used on any type of constant use basis. Heck the water that these ever saw probably never added up to more than 50 gallons in a weekend, so plenty of time to leach into the ground until next month or longer till hunting again.

Yes, the township REALLY frowns on this, but in a SHTF scenario do you think the building inspector is going to see if you have permits? He may very well be in the next camp over doing the same thing!

hope this helps
Why not try something like this.
Dig the hole a bit larger. Make a hole in side of drum 3-4 inches from the top for the sewer drain pipe. DO NOT FILL BARREL with rain rock. Place barrel in hole and backfill AROUND barrel with rain rock. Cut second hole in top of barrel say 8-10 inch diameter. Position lid over this hole with loop handle. Position 2-3 5 gallon buckets with bottoms cut out over hole in top of barrel. Continue backfill of barrel with rain rock to say 4-6 inches shy from top. Backfill rest of barrel and CAREFULLY around 'tube of buckets' ACCESS PIPE. Make a lid/top for AP. Park a TWO MAN ROCK or large planter over ACCESS PIPE to disguise it. As time goes by and barrel fills with sewage move rock, pull off barrel lid and drop hose for waste discharge pump to transfer waste to portable (wheeled tank) and dump at undisclosed location some distance from your camp. (I realize there are some 'holes' in my logic here...just another idea to contemplate.)

Theoretically why not bury 2 barrels. Design/build as you would a "normal" septic/drainfield with 4" sanitary pipe lines backfilled with drain rock. Rent a small Kubota type backhoe and do excavating yourself. Preposition 5 yards drain rock close to jobsite. Camoflauge rock pile. People will often steal from crush/drain rock piles and think nothing of it. There is a fiber type cloth available at Home Depot type stores. Lay this material down on rain rock before backfilling with dirt. Otherwise over time your drainfield becomes compromised with dirt/rock mix. This material is inexpensive and has a long life when buried.


Grass fed Beef..it's what's fer supper July 4th.

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